Thu, April 25 2013

On a personal note: In support of leaning in

Katya Andresen's avatar

Author, Robin Hood Marketing

Filed under:   Personal •

This week, I published a personal post on my LinkedIn blog.  I thought I’d share it here.  I was asked by LinkedIn to post on the theme of “my best career mistake.”  You can view the original post here.  I welcome your reactions and thoughts.

Eight years ago, I found myself scraping the tops off store-bought cupcakes in my kitchen at one in the morning. I was replacing the obviously baker-applied icing with hand-applied frosting so the cupcakes would look passably homemade when I brought them to my daughter’s school the next day to celebrate her birthday.

What would possess me to do such a bizarre thing? Shame. Or, to put it more fully, it was the mistake of trying to do it all well - and the fear of facing in myself that I could not.

Back then the icing switch-up seemed a better idea than turning up at school with obviously store-bought birthday cupcakes. After all, the school staff had made clear that home-made snacks were strongly preferred, and every other mother seemed capable of bringing lovingly hand-prepared, organic treats on birthdays. But I’d worked late that night, so the best I could do was cosmetic surgery on baked goods. My daughter didn’t care. A cupcake was a cupcake in her view, and we were going to bake a cake together that weekend when we celebrated as family. I was the one who cared. I was afraid of being The Bad Mom. Just as I feared being The Bad Worker when I was late to work because of school activities.

It wasn’t about what other people thought that was the problem. It was what I thought of myself.

Fast forward to last month, when I was on a panel discussing Women in Leadership. Every woman alongside me publicly admitted the same fleeting fears - and the same feelings of failure and fraudulence in their lives and careers. We know we can’t do it all, but that doesn’t stop us from feeling bad about that fact on any given day. It was an enormous relief to admit this - and talk about how we handle it.

This theme arises in Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In and hearing it from someone that accomplished was another revelation for me. I’m glad she admits her own similar moments - and irritated by dismissal of how important this admission is. I’ve read many negative reviews of the book. Most boil down to one or all of these statements:

  - Shut up, Sheryl: This book is a solution in search of a problem, or it addresses the wrong problem. Women aren’t holding themselves back in the ways you say.
  - Mind your own business, Sheryl: You shouldn’t be telling other women how to lean in.
  - Easy for you to say, Sheryl: You are privileged and so leaning in works for you (you have lots of help). It won’t for the rest of us.

I’m distressed by these reactions because many of them miss the point and make quite clear the critics haven’t read the whole book. And because fear of this kind of judgment of a life is exactly what drove me into the kitchen to fake my cupcakes.

I feel it’s time for us to discuss, honor and learn from however we struggle or succeed - whether it’s from someone who has made it big or is making it day by day. To me, this is a major point of the book and the very purpose of this post. Having these conversations, openly, is good for everyone.

Sandberg writes,

“We all want the same thing: to feel comfortable with our choices and to feel validated by those around us. So let’s start by validating one another. Mothers who work outside the home should regard women who work inside the home as real workers. And mothers who work inside the home should be equally respectful of those choosing another option.”

In addition to calling a truce in the gender wars, we should also find a peace with ourselves. By overcoming our own insecurities regarding our own paths, we can focus on something bigger and better: how all of us - men and women - can better support each other’s growth. We should find ourselves in fewer hidden cupcake moments and instead in more soul-searching, constructive reflection. As Sandberg notes: “We need to talk and listen and debate and refute and instruct and learn and evolve.”

I’ll share my choice: to work outside the home and be a mother, however imperfectly. I try to lean in as well as to stop hiding that it’s sometimes hard despite my relative fortune. So I’m fessing up about those silly fake cakes and sharing what I wish I’d known in the wee hours eight years ago: We all have paths to take, whoever we are, and those ways of living all have trade-offs. We gain, not lose, power by owning that imperfect reality, living it without shame and learning from whoever else is willing to share their experience.

To me, the real art of the lean-in is admitting the fear of falling short on my own path and pushing onward anyway. If I’d known it eight years ago, I would have showed up at school with plastic-encased, professionally frosted cupcakes in all their store-bought glory. And I would have known what mattered was that I was there, learning in to the experience of working motherhood and finding a way to be there to celebrate the most important of birthdays. After all, it doesn’t get any better than that.

  • Comment: (3)   

Comments

I find it interesting that there have been no comments yet to your blog…especially since I am just reading it after procrastinating going through my inbox, LOL! But maybe the lack of comments is proof of what you are writing about - the difficulty we have as women and Mom’s to openly talk about the horrible monsters in our pervasive and sometimes overpowering “fear closets” that actually rule many of our daily experiences, whether we acknowledge them or not! I appreciate your honesty, as I have found that allowing myself to be ME, whether it’s in presentations I give, in relation to my housework (well….lack thereof, LOL), with my kids, or in relationships with those around me, is quite freeing! I feel very blessed to have a small group of women who feel the same way and we support each other in our quest to live authentically. Now I will have to read the book…..we’ll see when I get to it smile

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  05/10  at  12:24 PM

I’ve enjoyed these more personal posts, thank you for sharing.  I have a million thoughts on this topic, but I’m pretty sure there’s a character limit!  I will say that guilt is an almost daily thing for all the moms I know.  Happy Mother’s Day!

Posted by Kyla Cromer  on  05/12  at  08:54 PM

As someone who owns and operates her own non-profit, I completely resonate with this.

As a woman who designed and runs her own company, I have faced countless obstacles in regards to getting myself heard and even staying employed in my job, due to gender-related conflicts.

My nonprofit is focused primarily on women and teen parents, so I am always working my clients through these same exact situations, in school and in the workplace.

Thank you for the read!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/My-Mothers-Voice/140709005968476

Posted by Donja M.  on  05/14  at  10:19 PM

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