Tue, April 28 2015

Why Social Fundraising Works

Caryn Stein's avatar

VP, Communications and Content, Network for Good

Filed under:   Fundraising essentials •

How does tapping into the power of relationships transform a simple ask into a more effective, inspiring call to action? This week’s Nonprofit 911 webinar is all about leveraging the social nature of giving to grow your donor base and raise more money for your cause. Join us this Thursday at 1pm ET to learn how to create your own social fundraising campaign. Today’s post is a taste of what we’ll cover.

So, why does social fundraising work so well? Why can’t organizations get the same results just sending out direct appeals to their audiences?

While giving is a highly emotional and at times deeply personal act, at its core, most giving is social. Our personal experiences and social ties often drive our decision to donate to a cause. Giving is how we relate and give back to our community and how we seek to improve the world for our fellow man.

Giving is also social in that we are strongly influenced by our family, friends, and networks—as well as those we perceive to be our peers. When an appeal for funds comes from someone in our networks that we trust, we’re more likely to act.

Here’s why social fundraising campaigns can inspire a wave of new supporters for your cause:

Social fundraising is based on a two-way relationship.
Traditional fundraising appeals are often one-sided, broadcast messages. These promotions can move people to act, but they don’t easily capture the emotion or relationship that can drive giving on a massive scale. Social fundraising puts the message in the mouth of the person who is most likely to prompt a donation:  someone the audience knows. The experience of supporting a good cause becomes one that people can have together, which makes it even more powerful.

People give to people.
A personal fundraiser is often more persuasive it comes to evoking emotion and inspiring action. Messengers from outside an organization are often more credible than the organization itself. That’s why an outside messenger, such as a donor that fundraises for an organization, has the potential to cut through the communications clutter.

The message is based in story.
There is no more powerful way to move people to action than through a compelling story. Storytelling often comes more naturally to supporters, who may have a personal stake in the cause. Stories told by people we know feel more meaningful than stories distributed by an organization. The more authentic a message is, the more likely people are to act. The effect of these personal stories is a powerful recruiting tool when you are looking to spread your message and recruit new supporters.

Social norms are powerful motivators.
You may think that you left peer pressure behind in middle school, but what our friends, family, and colleagues do still holds strong influence over the actions we take. Humans tend to want to conform to the social norm—what we feel is the standard, accepted behavior. Social fundraising campaigns are a great way to establish a social norm of giving. When others see that friends, family, and their extended networks are coming together to support a good cause, it’s hard to resist joining in. Think of it as peer pressure for good.

So, tapping into social giving can make a big difference for your fundraising results, whether you implement some of these tactics in your next appeal, or decide to launch a more structured event.

Want more ideas? Download our new guide, The Secrets of Social Fundraising Success for more tips on how to get started on what to look for in technology that makes peer-driven fundraising easy and fun.

Mon, April 27 2015

4 Thank You Musts for Monthly Donors

Caryn Stein's avatar

VP, Communications and Content, Network for Good

Filed under:   Fundraising essentials • Recurring Giving •

Editor’s note:  Our thoughts are with those affected by the massive earthquake and aftershocks in Nepal. You can help. To donate to the relief efforts, visit our disaster response page.


We’re in the last few days of our Recurring Giving Challengecheck out which campaigns are sitting atop our leaderboard and are in the running for their share of $20K in challenge rewards!

You’ve put a lot of work into recruiting recurring gifts from your supporters. Once you have monthly donors on board, you can just coast, right?

WRONG.

Even though they have set up and committed to a recurring gift, you still need to cultivate and build relationships with these donors. While thanking monthly donors isn’t much different than thanking donors in general, there is one big difference:  you have a lot more riding on monthly donors, as their lifetime value is likely to be much greater than your average one-time donor.

Use your thank you letter as an opportunity to show gratitude, but also to lay the groundwork for a long-term relationship. Donor gratitude is so important we have an entire guide devoted just to this very topic. Here are four musts for your thank yous to monthly donors:

1. Be prompt.
In addition to an immediate, personalized confirmation that their gift was processed successfully, you should thank your sustainers within a few days of setting up their recurring donation. Have a plan in place to make this happen quickly and make it a priority. Your goal is to keep that warm fuzzy feeling going as soon as possible after the gift was initiated. You may wish to send an email, a written note, or follow up with a phone call. It wouldn’t hurt to do all three over the course of those first few months once someone joins your monthly giving program.

2. Be personal.
In addition to addressing the donor by name, sign your thank you letters from a real person. Promise me that you won’t send thank yous that start out with “dear friend” or “dear supporter.” Not only is it boring and mechanical, it sends a signal of “we can’t be bothered.” Also, get creative with who signs your electronic and mailed letters–a board member, a volunteer, or a beneficiary can add significance to your acknowledgement. Make sure there is a real live human behind your stewardship efforts.

3. Be genuine.
Express your sincere gratitude and let your monthly donors know what their ongoing support will mean for your organization. Tell a short, emotion-filled story or share an example that shows the human impact of a recurring gift. Remind the donor what they are making possible. Tug at the heartstrings and bring your mission to life. This reinforces your donor’s decision to give an sustaining gift.

4. Be specific.
I covered the idea of specificity earlier this month, but it bears repeating because it’s so important. Include details about when, why, and what the donor is giving and which programs or results their recurring gift will support. All donors want to know that their gift is making a difference, and rich details help donors know their gift was noticed and appreciated.

Want more help thanking your monthly donors? Download our Recurring Donor Communication Guide and Templates for examples you can use today.

Fri, April 24 2015

Nonprofit Spotlight: True Impact Ministries

Annika Pettitt's avatar

Customer Success Manager, Network for Good

Filed under:   Fun stuff •

Network for Good works with so many amazing nonprofits and we want to introduce you to them and the great work they are doing! As part of our Recurring Giving Challenge we’re highlighting members of our leaderboard who are producing compelling, creative campaigns to recruit recurring donors and build a sustainable fundraising model for their organization. Today I want you to meet True Impact Ministries, a customer using recurring giving to sponsor children and the current holder of 4th place on our leaderboard.

Meet True Impact Ministries

Nonprofit Spotlight: True Impact Ministries

Like so many nonprofit organizations, True Impact Ministries has changed and molded its mission to meet the needs of the communities it serves. Ten years ago, when True Impact’s founders Andy and Susie Stewart first began their work, they brought a small team of volunteers to Uganda to help build a modest school house. It was the beginning of an ever-expanding mission that now includes orphan homes, water structures, and medical care.

True Impact Ministries believes they have the ability to help ordinary people make an extraordinary impact on the lives of people in impoverished areas of the world. Since their humble beginnings in 2004, through the establishment as an independent nonprofit 3 years ago, they’ve proven this to be true. Their groups of volunteers have grown from just a handful to 35 volunteers planning their visit to Uganda this June! And as their mission grows, so too has their circle of supporters.

True Impact Ministries

Sponsorship Model

In 2006 True Impact Ministries completed their second building project, an orphan home and rainwater collection system in Naama, Uganda. With this project they’d solved a problem by providing shelter, and created another by taking on the care of children in need. Building projects alone would not provide the schooling, medical care, food, and clothing these children needed to thrive. It was a problem they embraced by creating their first sponsorship program, a funding strategy that has helped them provide continual support for the children they serve.

Creating a Real Connection

One of the keys to their sponsorship program’s success is in TIM’s ability to create a lasting connection between their donors and volunteers and the children they’re supporting. From individual pictures and descriptions for every child on their sponsorship page, to their use of fun and approachable videos on social media, they work to create a true connection that makes a sponsorship more than just a donation.

The kids at Salem Children Center in 2006 seeing themselves on video for the first time. Recognize some faces, team members and sponsors? These kids are so big now!

Posted by True Impact Ministries on Tuesday, October 21, 2014

For more great videos and pictures head on over to Facebook to like True Impact Ministries and support the work they do!

Fri, April 24 2015

How Giving is Growing Online: The Latest from the Digital Giving Index

Caryn Stein's avatar

VP, Communications and Content, Network for Good

Filed under:   Big Thoughts on Giving • Fundraising essentials •

Where is online giving going? How do you capture more digital dollars for your cause?

To make a smart plan for your digital giving spend and online fundraising strategy, you need to understand how donors are giving online. Since 2010, Network for Good has published the Digital Giving Index which looks at online giving trends across the Network for Good platform, including both branded and generic donation pages, social fundraising sites, portal giving, and employee giving.

The Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index data represents $233 million in giving for 2014 representing donations to 45,000 charities. While online donations still represent less than 10% of all charitable giving, the growth of online giving continues to outpace the rate of growth for overall giving. In 2014, the donations on Network for Good’s online giving platform increased 23% over 2013.

Digital Giving Index 2014

Here are a few key takeaways from our giving data:

The Channel Matters

Donors give differently depending on the online giving channel they use. While we see portal giving spike during times of disaster or at the end of the year, we still see the majority of online donations coming in through a nonprofit’s website via an online giving page.

Average gift size also fluctuates depending on the channel. The largest average donations come in through employee giving, as these donations are often influenced by corporate matching gifts. 

Donation by Channel

The Experience Matters

Think all giving pages are the same? For online donors, the giving experience matters.

Generic vs. Branded

Year after year we find that nonprofits raise more on branded giving pages vs. generic giving experiences, e-commerce-style solutions, or charity giving portals. Donors are more likely to give, give larger amounts, and initiate more recurring gifts on branded giving pages that look and feel like a nonprofit’s website or fundraising campaign. This makes sense as these types of giving experience offer donors an easy and cohesive experience that keeps them in the moment of giving.

The Rise of Social Fundraising

Social fundraising itself isn’t new, but the power of social media combined with personal networks—along with the ease of online fundraising pages—have enabled this type of peer giving to really take off.

The impact of peer fundraising and socially-driven campaigns has increased dramatically as the tools and communication channels that make it easy for donors to advocate on organizations’ behalf have become mainstream. Social fundraising has seen explosive growth over the last few years, with donation volume growing 70% in 2014. Better still, the average donation amount for gifts through these campaigns has grown 52% just in the last year.

Growth by Channel

Want more insight on social fundraising and how you can use it to expand your reach? Download our free Secrets to Social Fundraising Success guide.

Big Giving on Big Days

It’s no surprise that giving fluctuates over time. We know that average online donation amounts shift with events, such as disasters or giving days, or seasonality. Donors give the largest gifts at the end of the year and during #GivingTuesday.

Average Gift by Date

Of course, December still drives a big share of annual giving. In 2014, 31% of all dollars came in during the month of December with 12% of annual giving happening on the last three days of the year.

Generous Procrastinators

To make the most of these big giving days, it’s crucial to have a solid online giving program in place with a donation experience that fully expresses your case for giving.

View and download the full infographic, and grab a copy of our new companion Online Fundraising Report for more insight on how donors are giving online and how you can make the most of your digital strategy.

Wed, April 22 2015

Create Great Visuals: 10 Tips and Tools for Nonprofits

Helene Kahn's avatar

Communications and Marketing, Network for Good

Filed under:   Marketing essentials •

More and more nonprofits are using visuals to tell their story, illustrate impact, and create a case for giving. But creating visuals can sometimes be costly, time consuming, and seemingly impossible without advanced software. At Network for Good, we see clients using visuals in amazing ways to share their stories, engage donors, and raise more money in ways that are effective, easy, and—guess what?—FREE! We've compiled a top 10 list of tools and techniques to help you incorporate more visuals into your organization's work.

10. Keep it simple! Start by taking and sharing pictures of your team and the people, places, or purpose you serve. Pictures taken with your phone are totally okay!

9. Empower your constituents to help. Ask volunteers, board members, and others involved with your organization to take pictures and send them to you. Then you'll have options to choose from when you need a photo.

Brianne Nadeau is Martha's Table! Supporter/Neighbor/Volunteer + Ward 1 DC Councilmember10 years#IAmMarthasTable at bit.ly/IAmMT

Posted by Martha's Table on Thursday, April 16, 2015

Martha's Table is encouraging their community to share #IAmMarthasTable photos on social media to celebrate their 35th anniversary.

8. Have pictures, but they need to be edited or jazzed up? Check out Picmonkey, a great free photo editing service.

7. Once you create a great image, make sure it's correctly sized for every social media channel. Our friends at Constant Contact created a great cheat sheet to help you size all your images.

6. Do file names like JPEG, PNG, and GIF confuse you as much as they confuse me? Here's a helpful chart to show you when to use what file type.

5. Still don't have a picture you want to use? Check out this helpful list of stock image sites to find a picture to fit your need.

4. Share your impact using an infographic. Check out Picktochart, a fantastic infographic creator that's free for nonprofits!

3. If you haven't discovered Canva yet, go check it out! Canva is our favorite tool on the marketing team here at Network for Good—and we're pretty sure it'll be your favorite too. Plus, it's free!

2. Join us tomorrow for our next Nonprofit911 webinar, “The Art of Social Media,” featuring Guy Kawasaki, chief evangelist at Canva. Guy will be talking about how to build your online presence and how to use visual tools to do so! Register now!

The Art of Social Media Webinar

We made this graphic with Canva!

1. Have fun and be creative! The days of posed headshots and perfectly positioned group photos are behind us. People engage with brands and organizations in fun, organic, and unique ways. Might we suggest a social media selfie contest?

Page 1 of 340 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Comments

comments powered by Disqus

<< Back to main