Wed, October 25 2006

The web 2.0-celebrity link

Katya Andresen's avatar

Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Social Media •

When I lived in Ukraine, my Mormon nanny’s boyfriend was a famous local radio personality.  (He was Mormon too.)  He had a radio show of celebrity gossip that translates into the name “Starsick,” the Ukrainian term for celebrity-obsessed.  Max (that is his name) was basically the Ukrainian Mormon radio version of Perez Hilton

I’m wondering if my

four

five readers here on this blog are feeling starsick about now.  Please bear with me, though, and I’ll try to make it worth your while. 

The best advice I have for people who want to use web 2.0/social networking stuff to promote their cause is to use the Internet to make it easy for your supporters to be your advocates.  Make them celebrities for your cause. 

Seth Godin calls this “Flipping the Funnel.”  Let your supporters hold your megaphone for you and your message will be amplified many times.  They are celebrities among their families and friends, and they can be great spokespeople for you!

So how do you do it?  Right now, if you have never done it before, use the web to find and listen to people who could be your biggest supporters.  Go to Technorati, a search of blogs, and type in things relevant to your cause.  Check out all the bloggers talking about your issue!  Develop a relationship with them.  Ask them for ideas and input, and you can see if they will tell their readers about your work.  Why create a blog when there are bloggers out there talking about your ideas already?  They are celebrities in their spheres, however small. 

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Tue, October 24 2006

The supporter as celebrity

Katya Andresen's avatar

Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Social Media •

Just in time for my “your supporters as celebrities” theme this week, our esteemed colleagues at DATA and the ONE Campaign today bring us this PSA

Here’s what I like about it:

1.) It suggests everyone can be a celebrity for the cause of making poverty history.  George Clooney and other celebs are side by side with people like you and me, standing up to vote for what they care about.  It suggests that I’m in famous company when I take action.  Network for Good agrees; in fact, we’re launching a campaign next month that encourages everyone to be a celebrity for their cause.  And we’ll give you cool tools to do it!  I really like this aspect of the ad.

2.) It is close to one clear call to action.  But it could be closer.  The ad says “Please vote. ONE.org.”  I’m a bit lost between the relationship between November 7, ONE and my vote.  It sounds like I should vote at ONE.org instead of at the polls.  I think the home page of ONE could make that a little simpler given the comments on YouTube.  I realize they may want me to “vote” to support ONE too, and give ONE my email address, but that confuses matters in this context.  I’m a big believer in one ad, one message!

3.) It’s open.  ONE put its ad out there on YouTube where people could react.  They let people make whatever remarks they wanted, however snarky, cynical or sentimental.  That’s the right thing to do.  It makes people feel you’re authentic and willing to engage in two-way conversation rather than sticking to controlling, one-way selling.  And it gives you great feedback to fine-tune your messages and materials.  It’s like one big focus group!

 

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