Sat, October 28 2006

The no-neck view of the world

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Marketing essentials •

Have you ever noticed how very young kids’ drawings usually don’t feature a person’s neck?  Have you wondered why?

My theory is that if you’re two or three years old and your perspective is pretty low to the ground, you don’t see people’s necks when you look up.  You see a head sitting on arms. 

I can’t think of a better analogy for marketing.  Marketing mandates that we look at the world through the eyes of our audience and communicate from that perspective.  It can be hard to tear ourselves away from the comfort of our long-necked world view, but we must. 

Believe me, I know how difficult it is.  I forget the marketing principles I tout all the time.  The brilliant folks out at ASU (namely a brilliant person by the name of Gregory Neidert) recently reminded me I was violating all my own marketing principles on Network for Good’s web site.  Where was the audience perspective?  Wouldn’t people who come to the site want it to know if it was safe or reliable?  Wouldn’t they want to know if other people trusted the site?  And why wasn’t the “search for your favorite charity”—the reason most people come to our site—the most prominent thing on the page?  Errrr, because I forgot to do as I say.

Here is the way our site was, and how it is now.  Since we started working completely from the audience perspective, conversion is up 30%.  If you haven’t read it, get this book from those ASU folks.

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Thu, October 26 2006

Your supporters are your best spokespeople

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Social Media •

Today I’m continuing yesterday’s theme: giving your supporters the means to promote you.  It’s even better than finding celebrity spokespeople.  After all, the number one reason people give money or take action is because someone asked them—especially someone they know.  So how do you give your core supporters ways to be evangelists for your cause? 

1. Send them a nifty email and ask them to forward it to five friends.  Make it an email that just asks for a simple action, like signing a petition or joining a community so you can get the email addresses of those five friends and cultivate them as donors. 

2. If they have a blog, ask them to link to you or fundraise for you on their blog.  Give them cool tools to do it.  At Network for Good, we’re creating cool tools to give bloggers to call attention to your cause next month.  In the meantime, check out Word of Blog.

3.  Send your supporters cool pictures or put them on Flickr and ask people to share the good work you are doing.  Pictures are so compelling.

4. Ask your supporters to hold events for you, like dinner party fundraisers or races and make it easy for them to recruit people with tools like First Giving.

5. Ask them to tell their stories to you (so you can spread them).  I love this new campaign encouraging women to vote by sharing stories of their “first times” voting in an attention-seizing way.  The personal stories your supporters have about why they support you are often far more interesting and compelling then any appeal you could create.

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Wed, October 25 2006

The web 2.0-celebrity link

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Social Media •

When I lived in Ukraine, my Mormon nanny’s boyfriend was a famous local radio personality.  (He was Mormon too.)  He had a radio show of celebrity gossip that translates into the name “Starsick,” the Ukrainian term for celebrity-obsessed.  Max (that is his name) was basically the Ukrainian Mormon radio version of Perez Hilton

I’m wondering if my

four

five readers here on this blog are feeling starsick about now.  Please bear with me, though, and I’ll try to make it worth your while. 

The best advice I have for people who want to use web 2.0/social networking stuff to promote their cause is to use the Internet to make it easy for your supporters to be your advocates.  Make them celebrities for your cause. 

Seth Godin calls this “Flipping the Funnel.”  Let your supporters hold your megaphone for you and your message will be amplified many times.  They are celebrities among their families and friends, and they can be great spokespeople for you!

So how do you do it?  Right now, if you have never done it before, use the web to find and listen to people who could be your biggest supporters.  Go to Technorati, a search of blogs, and type in things relevant to your cause.  Check out all the bloggers talking about your issue!  Develop a relationship with them.  Ask them for ideas and input, and you can see if they will tell their readers about your work.  Why create a blog when there are bloggers out there talking about your ideas already?  They are celebrities in their spheres, however small. 

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Tue, October 24 2006

The supporter as celebrity

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Social Media •

Just in time for my “your supporters as celebrities” theme this week, our esteemed colleagues at DATA and the ONE Campaign today bring us this PSA

Here’s what I like about it:

1.) It suggests everyone can be a celebrity for the cause of making poverty history.  George Clooney and other celebs are side by side with people like you and me, standing up to vote for what they care about.  It suggests that I’m in famous company when I take action.  Network for Good agrees; in fact, we’re launching a campaign next month that encourages everyone to be a celebrity for their cause.  And we’ll give you cool tools to do it!  I really like this aspect of the ad.

2.) It is close to one clear call to action.  But it could be closer.  The ad says “Please vote. ONE.org.”  I’m a bit lost between the relationship between November 7, ONE and my vote.  It sounds like I should vote at ONE.org instead of at the polls.  I think the home page of ONE could make that a little simpler given the comments on YouTube.  I realize they may want me to “vote” to support ONE too, and give ONE my email address, but that confuses matters in this context.  I’m a big believer in one ad, one message!

3.) It’s open.  ONE put its ad out there on YouTube where people could react.  They let people make whatever remarks they wanted, however snarky, cynical or sentimental.  That’s the right thing to do.  It makes people feel you’re authentic and willing to engage in two-way conversation rather than sticking to controlling, one-way selling.  And it gives you great feedback to fine-tune your messages and materials.  It’s like one big focus group!

 

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Mon, October 23 2006

Cult of celebrity - Dan Aykroyd as Ghandi

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Fun stuff •

There is a truly fabulous, addictive web site called My Heritage.  I heard about it from bloggers John Mayer and Britt Bravo.  Upload a photo and you learn just which celebrity you resemble.  My Heritage gets what this world is coming to: web 2.0 is all about personal celebrity.  Anyone can be a publisher, musician, pundit, whatever, online.  Anyone can connect, and anyone can find a constituency. 

This is really good news for us.  This week, I’m going to blog about turning our supporters into celebrities for our charity. 

To get us in the mood, you need to know I look like Kathy Bates and Ghandi, well, he looks a little like Dan Aykroyd or Roger Daltrey.  Thanks wikipedia for the photo.  Stay tuned. 

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