Wed, September 19 2007

More free marketing calls!

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Marketing essentials •

We have another free Nonprofit 911 call coming up in October here at Network for Good.

The topic is Email Fundraising on a Tight Budget and it’s Tuesday, October 2 at 1pm (eastern)
Speaker: Marc Lee, Affinity Resources

Sign up here.
 
On this page, you can also download free transcripts of our last three calls, including:

September Nonprofit 911: Crafting Your Call to Action
 
August Nonprofit 911:Website 101 for Fundraisers

July Nonprofit 911: Cultivating Donors Online

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Tue, September 18 2007

Live Blogging from Dreamforce

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Marketing essentials •

Katya’s note:  My colleague Jono, who guest-starred here at the blog earlier this year when I was on a tropical island, is at Salesforce’s Dreamforce meeting out in San Fran.  He’s going to share some reports hot from the center of relationship management nirvana.  Network for Good has been working with Salesforce.com to adapt its database tools to nonprofits.  Here’s what he’s heard so far—more to follow!

By Jono Smith

Hundreds of nonprofit marketers and fundraisers are among the 7,000 attendees from 42 countries gathering this week in San Francisco at Dreamforce 2007, Salesforce.com's annual users' conference. I will be blogging from Dreamforce this week with examples and tips for using technology to improve the effectiveness of nonprofit marketing.

In the meantime, I am currently live blogging from the opening keynote, where salesforce CEO Marc Benioff is speaking about how community-driven models—arising from the Internet—create new possibilities for organizations to innovate without huge investments in software and technology infrastructure. Marc just introduced another Marc—Marc Sternberg is the principal of Bronx Lab School, a nonprofit, public college preparatory school funded in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The vision for Bronx Lab School is uncomplicated: with the right support, work ethic and attitude, its students can succeed. Through small class and school size, a passionate and cohesive staff committed to innovative and dynamic project-based instruction, and a non-negotiable culture of excellence, Bronx Lab's students excel.

School Principal Marc Sternberg is speaking about how his Bronx Lab School is managing accountability by using salesforce to measure and track behavior, attendance and homework.

"One of the important metrics we must report to the Department of Education is our student attendance. With accurate attendance benchmarks, we can retain control of the way we run our school, and stay up-to-date on our teaching staff needs. Salesforce has allowed us to create a detailed student database that does much more than generate the reports we need for the city, it helps us identify students who may need extra help to stay in school."

If you are interested in examples of how technology is helping nonprofits improve their marketing and online fundraising results, stay tuned this week for more updates from Dreamforce. If you are attending Dreamforce, stop by and visit Network for Good in the nonprofit pavilion on Tuesday between 11am-12:30pm.

Dreamforce 2007 Keynote

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Fri, September 14 2007

What is good: being relentlessly generous

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Fundraising essentials •

What is good fundraising and what is bad fundraising?  What is the difference between good outreach and bad outreach?

I think the difference between good and bad has a lot to do with generosity.

If you’re focused on fundraising, you’re probably focused on inspiring generosity in other people.  But how generous are you?  I’ve found in life, in fundraising and in blogging, the more generous I am, the more successful my efforts.  Scrooges in terms of sharing information, credit and or time get little.

Be a good fundraiser (and person) by:

1. BEING GENEROUS WITH OUR THANKS: Thank people before they give, after they give and every chance you get.  All of us have many options for spending the precious time we have in our short lives.  If someone chooses to spend a few moments on you - by reading your message or taking your call, not just by giving - you should be honored.  Thank people for even bothering to pay attention.  Be generous in thanking - and in listening.

2. BEING GENEROUS WITH OUR INFORMATION:  If you have really useful information, share it first and ask for support after.  You could require money and registration to get valuable information from your organization, but increasingly online users will just go elsewhere if you present that barrier.  Give it away and people will give.  I truly believe this.  Just look at public radio.  How many listeners would they have if you had to pay to tune in, like cable TV?  We give away loads of free trainings and information here at Network for Good—and wouldn’t you know it, a lot of the people who get things for free decide to become paying customers of our other services.

3. BEING GENEROUS WITH GIVING CREDIT:  Blog reader Zan of the Pride Foundation’s annual report is called the Gratitude Report.  What an amazing display of generosity - instead of grandstanding about how great their organization is, they put the spotlight on their supporters.  That is generosity at its finest.  Give credit freely and lavishly - it feels good and it all comes back to you, really.

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Thu, September 13 2007

My four year old knows bad marketing

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Marketing essentials •

My four year old just started Montessori school, and she is an angel at school.  But then she comes home, regresses to age two, raises hell, and generally brings me to my knees.  I’m told this is normal as a child adjusts to their first full-day schooling experience.  It’s either that or evidence of my poor parenting skills. 

This week I have realized there were some marketing parallels in the behavior I see.  This post is about making lemonade from a four-year-old lemon.

Yes, my four-year-old child knows bad marketing.  Here are three rules of bad marketing courtesy of her:

1. If you want to say something, yell it from your current location, even if your mother is on another floor of the house.  This is what I call “come to me” marketing.  Bad marketing is putting your message out there and expecting people to come to hear it.  Good marketing is going to where people are (mentally, physically, temporally) and delivering the message directly to them.

2. Get someone’s attention, but fail to deliver a compelling message.  “Mom. Mom.  Mom.  Mom.”  “Yes, sweetie?”  Then forget what you had to say or make something up.  Bad marketing is all about bad messages.  Good marketing is about getting attention AND good messaging.

3. Throw a tantrum to get attention.  Show how dire things are by kicking and screaming because the Hello Kitty stickers are missing.  Bad marketers make their appeals apocalyptic and scare away the audience.  Good marketers show how bad can become good.  They are inspirational and aspirational.

So there you have it.

Oh, and a bonus: A free copy of Robin Hood to the first person to offer parenting advice as a comment on this post.

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Tue, September 11 2007

Video: the what, why and how for nonprofits

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Author, Robin Hood Marketing

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Filed under:   Social Media •

Photo credit: tychay, flickr

Nancy Schwartz of Getting Attention fame is hosting an excellent carnival this week on video.  Click here to read about:

-Whether video is worth it
-How to use it effectively
-Tips for good video
-Examples of who is doing it well

 

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